Difference between 4130 cromo and 100% cromo

grumpySteve wrote: 4130 is a grade of chromoly. Saying 100 % chromoly equitable means all the tubes are chromoly, but is dim about the class, so one … more
grumpySteve wrote: 4130 is a rate of chromoly. Saying 100 % chromoly precisely means all the tubes are chromoly, but is dim about the grade, so one can assume it is n’t 4130 and is a cheaper degree

…more

Maybe. .. . but I also think some companies just say “chromoly” when they mean 4130. I’m not sure we can assume it’s not 4130…. But, that’s true, it’s possible it isn’t…… Hmmmm.

SHANX, what brands are you talking about?

For example:

http://www.ibiscycles.com/support/technical_articles/metallurgy_for_cyclists/steel_is_real/

“Specifically, 4130 steel – an alloy steel – which is commonly known in the bike industry as chrome-moly, contains the following alloying agents: 0.28- to 0.33-percent carbon, 0.4- to 0.6-percent manganese, 0.8- to 1.1-percent cromium, 0.15- to 0.25-percent molybdenum, 0.04-percent phosphorous, 0.04-percent sulfur, and 0.2- to 0.35-percent silicon. The other 95-plus percent is made up of good old-fashioned iron. Now, there are hundreds of kinds of steel, but 4130 finds its way into bike frames because, among other attributes, of its weldability, formability, strength, ductility and toughness. (Many low-buck frames are made with 1020 steel, which is called plain carbon steel, and has significantly lower strength than the chromium-molybdenum steels.)

The numbers that I’m throwing out are designated by the Society of Automotive Engineers and American Iron and Steel Institute: 41XX designates a chromium-molybdenum steel (CrMo), while 10XX designates a plain carbon steel – which, if compared to 41XX steels, has fewer alloying agents, lower strength and lower cost. The first number specifies the type of steel: 1 = plain carbon, 2 = nickel, 3 = nickel chromium, 4 = nickel, chromium and molybdenum, 5 = chromium, etcetera, ad nauseam…. The second number relates to different things with different alloys. In the case of 4130, it defines the percentage of chromium and molybdenum in the alloy. The last two numbers tell you the amount of carbon, expressed as hundredths of a percent. 4130 therefore has 0.3 percent carbon.

From now on, in the bicycle lexicon of this series, I’ll be using 4130 and CrMo interchangeably, even though not all CrMo’s are 4130.
CrMo is by far the most common of all the steels used to build high- quality bicycle frames. And I’m making an assumption that the readers of VeloNews who ride steel frames aren’t riding Muffy’s (That’s the generic name for the Murray-Huffy style of bike you can buy at those fine American institutions like Kmart and Wal-mart.) Muffy-grade steel is barely above rebar on the steel “food chain”; rebar is essentially a blend of melted 1956 Chevys, washing machines and shopping carts.”
possibly. .. . but I besides think some companies fair say “ chromoly ” when they mean 4130. I ‘m not indisputable we can assume it ‘s not 4130 …. But, that ‘s dependable, it ‘s possible it is n’t … … Hmmmm.SHANX, what brands are you talking about ? For case : ” specifically, 4130 steel – an admixture steel – which is normally known in the motorcycle diligence as chrome-moly, contains the following alloy agents : 0.28- to 0.33-percent carbon, 0.4- to 0.6-percent manganese, 0.8- to 1.1-percent cromium, 0.15- to 0.25-percent molybdenum, 0.04-percent phosphorous, 0.04-percent sulfur, and 0.2- to 0.35-percent silicon. The other 95-plus percentage is made up of good antique iron. immediately, there are hundreds of kinds of steel, but 4130 finds its manner into bicycle frames because, among other attributes, of its weldability, formability, persuasiveness, ductility and huskiness. ( many low-buck frames are made with 1020 steel, which is called plain carbon steel, and has significantly lower lastingness than the chromium-molybdenum steels. ) The numbers that I ‘m throwing out are designated by the Society of Automotive Engineers and American Iron and Steel Institute : 41XX designates a chromium-molybdenum steel ( CrMo ), while 10XX designates a plain carbon steel – which, if compared to 41XX steels, has fewer alloying agents, lower strength and lower price. The first number specifies the character of steel : 1 = knit carbon, 2 = nickel, 3 = nickel chromium, 4 = nickel, chromium and molybdenum, 5 = chromium, and so forth, ad nauseam …. The second count relates to different things with different alloys. In the case of 4130, it defines the percentage of chromium and molybdenum in the debase. The last two numbers tell you the come of carbon, expressed as hundredths of a percentage. 4130 therefore has 0.3 percentage carbon.CrMo is by far the most common of all the steels used to build high- quality bicycle frames. And I ‘m making an assumption that the readers of VeloNews who ride steel frames are n’t riding Muffy ‘s ( That ‘s the generic appoint for the Murray-Huffy style of motorcycle you can buy at those finely american institutions like Kmart and Wal-mart. ) Muffy-grade steel is scantily above rebar on the steel “ food chain ” ; rebar is basically a blend of mellow 1956 Chevys, washing machines and shopping carts. ”

source : https://bikehow.com
Category : Cycling
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